Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dl.umsu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/11665
Title: Mate value and self-esteem: Evidence from eight cultural groups
Authors: Goodwin, R;Marshall, TC;Fulop, M;Adonu, J;Spiewak, S;Neto, F;Hernandez Plaza, S
Year: 2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Description: Copyright @ 2012 Goodwin et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. The article was made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund.
This paper explores self-perceived mate value (SPMV), and its association with self-esteem, in eight cultures. 1066 participants, from 8 cultural groups in 7 countries, rated themselves on 24 SPMVs and completed a measure of self-esteem. Consistent with evolutionary theory, women were more likely to emphasise their caring and passionate romantic nature. In line with previous cross-cultural research, characteristics indicating passion and romance and social attractiveness were stressed more by respondents from individualistic cultures, and those higher on self-expression (rather than survival) values; characteristics indicative of maturity and confidence were more likely to be mentioned by those from Traditional, rather than Secular, cultures. Contrary to gender role theory, societal equality had only limited interactions with sex and SPMV, with honesty of greater significance for male self-esteem in societies with unequal gender roles. These results point to the importance of cultural and environmental factors in influencing self-perceived mate qualities, and are discussed in relation to broader debates about the impact of gender role equality on sex differences in personality and mating strategies.
URI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3338495/?tool=pmcentrez
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/6425
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036106
Standard no: PLoS One, 7(4): e36106, Apr 2012
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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